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Overview of my handmade bicycle

I'm sure I will make more videos specific to individual components of this bike, but this video goes over most of the parts. If you'd be interested in seeing more videos detailing how I made it (or about some of my other projects) comment/like/subscribe and I'll put the time into editing. Here are some of the things I could make videos about, let me know which you'd be most interested in:

Making an Elliptical Storm Window

So I had spent a long cold winter fabricating around forty-or-so old tymee tilt out storm windows for our 1895 house. That was tough but I was left with an even more vexing problem of how to protect an elliptical leaded glass window high up on the facade. First was getting on a  high ladder and taking measurements and then reproducing it in drawing. Suffice to say, the ancient Greeks figured out how to easily draw an ellipse with two sticks and a piece of string, but I cheated with digital drawing software and made a print out as a template.

Bike Hacks

So I ride my bike to and from work almost every day and given NHV's slow but methodical march towards normalization of bicycles on roadways, I decided it would be safe and proper to get a bike light. The bicycle accessory industry has a dazzling array of options with equally dazzling expense. Because my priorities are focused less upon lighting the roadway and more upon making my presence evident to motorists, I opted out of spending hundreds of dollars on a high tech “bike light”.

T-Shirt Silkscreening

A long time ago I saw a funny logo about bike riding in San Fran and, given the rustic state of our own city's road infrastructure, it inspired me to rework the logo for New Haven. I've always been fond of the New Haven Railroad logo designed by Herbert Matter and used that as the basis of the design. I then merged in a human figure ala Saul Bass (Hitchcock's "Vertigo" logo) and a touch of Milton Glasier's "I Love New York" logo.

Cremona Bread

So on July 4th I did an epic barbecue involving dry rubbed, apple smoked pulled pork served on Hawaiian Malasadas (Portuguese deep fried donuts) with fresh cabbage slaw and mango/jalapeno sauce...but that’s not what this blog entry is about. A byproduct of that effort was me not wanting to waste the half inch of fatback (skin and fat layer) that I cut off of the two pork shoulders.

Season Two of MakeHaven Animating

 

We have your favorite characters returning and three new stars entering the cast.

  • Colin Bunting is an engineer and designer. He has built lots of drones, can bend a laser cutter or 3d printer to his will and has entrepreneurship in his blood.
  • Catherine Cazes-Wiley is a hat designer and crafter. She is from France but has taken to her new home in the USA by volunteering to teaching marketable crafting skills people with disabilities, exiting homelessness or who are settling refugees.
  • Lior Trestman is an advocate for making a better community. If he is not volunteering at the bike coop or working on his startup he is at MakeHaven in the woodshop showing people safe tool use or teaching techniques.

Three Makers Share Their Projects

As part of the Arts and Ideas Festival we asked a number our members to demonstrate the work they are doing on projects. Here are three of those makers summarizing their projects in under a minute and a half. 

 

Elisa Shares Her Laser Cutter Work

Elisa talks about her work to use the laser to cut intricate paper designs and create a fold-able wood book cover.

 

Its a bowl!...sort of.

So I finished my first bowl. In truth the past few months have been mostly waiting for the wood to dry and stabilize. One has to do that by slowly opening a bigger and bigger aperture in the plastic bag the bowl is stored in. At first it literally sweats and then slows down over time. Near the end of drying I had to mitigate some splitting with butterfly keys (a.k.a. bow ties or dutchmen) and then do some filling with cyanoacrylate glue (crazy glue or zap-a-gap) mixed with sawdust.

MakeHaven Becomes First Fab Lab In Connecticut

MakeHaven has been recognized as the first FabLab in Connecticut. This designation will help to propel MakeHaven as a technical prototyping platform for innovation, invention and entrepreneurship. Being recognized as a FabLab means connecting to a global community of fabricators, artists, scientists, engineers, educators, students, amateurs, professionals, of all ages located in more than 78 countries.

Maker Idea #4 Use Sensors to control lights on Your Skateboard, Shoes or Ears

MakeHaven has sensors and Arduinos with them you can take senor data (sound, light, vibration, radio, etc) and turn it into light. How about a skate board that lights brighter the faster you go, or earrings that light up when you shake your head, or a scarf that tells you the temperature.

We bought a bunch of these led lights (neo pixils) for the make-a-thon, register now and start inventing!

 

Ears

Maker Idea #1. Sew, then Light Up a Dress

For our upcoming make-a-thon we are rounding up some ideas of what you can make at the event. Idea number one is to sew and light some clothing.

MakeHaven has sewing machines and there are various fabrics available next door at the creative reuse center.  We have lots of LEDs, soldering irons, batteries, arduinos, neopixles, sensors and other supplies electrify your worn creations.

Day 3650, More Wood Carving

Really I've only been jumping on this project for about 20 minute spurts one or two nights a week. Today I did a good 3-4 hour burst and made some good headway. Neverheless, its oak and relatively uncomprimising. Spoke a little too soon about not annoying Gina with chopping noise from the basement but the upside is that she's retreated to the farthest upper corner of our house, stumbled upon and restarted a quilt project. We're both contemplating submitting these to the Durham Fair. Theres $6 to be made and a sweet-ass blue ribbon.

Cure For A Fever....More Wood Carving

Being snowed in is a perfect excuse to do more bowl carving. After  smoothing the exterior with a draw knife I decided to take a whack (pun intended) at the bowl interior. This is about 15 minutes of hewing with an adze.  Bowl carving is done  with super green (freshly cut) wood and the block is stored in a sealed plastic bag to avoid too much water loss prior to the finished shape. I try to work symmetrically so that between sessions the bowl will perspire evenly and hopefully avoid warpage. The work is usually done on a tree stump to avoid tool damage.

Wood Bowl Smoothing

I got a beautiful old French clamp at a yard sale for 10 bucks and Jerry rigged it to my workbench (it's supposed to be plumb but doesn't matter much for my purpose. Unlike the now ubiquitous parallel jaw bench vice, this has a pinned connection at bottom allowing one to clamp oblong objects as one would do with a Jorgenson clamp. Using a razor sharp draw knife to smooth (that's paint on my chair, not blood); along the grain is easy; across the end grains is not so easy.

More Wood Bowl Carving

Right now I only have a curved adze. Its hooked inward and elliptical in cross-section and typically it would be used for hollowing out an interior (a hooked adze with a flat crossection seems to be typically use for bowl exteriors but what do I know…I’m a beginner and I only have one tool.) I seem to be spending 1-2 hours to rough out each side and it seems like another hour to smooth.

Wood Bowl Carving

Beginning : As a sort of regression therapy I've decided to try my hand at stone age (updated to iron age) technology and do some wood bowl carving with an adze. Got a great deal from a fellow in Bulgaria that calls his company "Happy Tools" on Etsy. He sells really nice quality hand forged adzes and my experience so far (on oak which is a surly wood)  is that it holds it razor edge well. Sculptor Susan Clinard kind enough to donate a green stump to me and I roughed it out in my backyard with a chainsaw (so far my only 20th century indulgence).

Building a Smarter New Haven

How we think about and experience transportation is likely to undergo radical change in the coming years. Right now cities like New Haven are trying to anticipate the infrastructure that will be needed in the next few decades. Because of the rapid change of technology those predictions are difficult, yet new technologies also hold tremendous possibility for improving city life.

Community Animators, Ready to Rock and Roll

I am excited to announce that we have five enthusiastic volunteers to animate our community. 
 
What does it mean to be a Community Animator? It means they have each committed to being at MakeHaven 3 hours per week over the next 6 months to help people learn and inspire members to make the most of our space. Each has a focus area and will be a resource for actives in that focus. Let me make the introductions:

From left to right in the photo is: